SAINT OF THE DAY: 09 JANUARY, 2015

Saint Julian and Saint Basilissa

Martyr
(† 313)

Saint Julian Martyr and Saint Basilissa

Saint Julian and Saint Basilissa, though married, lived by mutual consent in perpetual chastity.

They sanctified themselves by the most perfect exercises of an ascetic life, and employed their revenues in relieving the poor and the sick.

For this purpose they converted their house into a kind of hospital, in which they sheltered up to a thousand poor people.

Basilissa attended those of her sex in separate lodgings, and Julian, who for his charity is known as the Hospitaler, cared for the men.

Egypt, where they lived, was in those days blessed with persons who, either in the cities or in the deserts, devoted themselves to the most perfect exercises of charity, penance, and mortification.

Conversions were numerous, and persecutions by furious pagans followed as the numbers of Christians increased.

Basilissa, after having survived seven of those, died in peace, foretelling to her husband that he would die a martyr.

Julian lived afterwards for a number of years, but eventually received the crown of a glorious martyrdom in 313.

His interrogation and his tortures were accompanied by astonishing prodigies and numerous conversions.

With him died thirty-one other persons, including a priest named Anthony, a new Christian named Anastasius, Celsus, the seven-year-old son of the judge who sentenced Julian, Marcianilla, the mother of Celsus, who when she came to visit her son was won over to the faith, and many other Christians.

Spared by fire and wild beasts, Saint Julian finally was decapitated.

His tomb became illustrious by many great miracles, including the cure of ten lepers on the same day.

Many churches and hospitals, in both the East and in the West, bear the name of one or another of these martyrs. Four churches at Rome and three in Paris are dedicated to Saint Julian.

(SOURCE: Little Pictorial Lives of the Saints, a compilation based on Butler’s Lives of the Saints and other sources by John Gilmary Shea (Benziger Brothers: New York, 1894); Les Petits Bollandistes: Vies des Saints, by Msgr. Paul Guérin (Bloud et Barral: Paris, 1882), Vol. 2)

READING OF THE DAY: 09 JANUARY, 2015

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“It happened that there was a man full of leprosy in one of the towns where Jesus was; and when he saw Jesus, he fell prostrate, pleaded with him, and said, “Lord, if you wish, you can make me clean.”

Jesus stretched out his hand, touched him, and said, “I do will it. Be made clean.”

And the leprosy left him immediately.

Then he ordered him not to tell anyone, but “Go, show yourself to the priest and offer for your cleansing what Moses prescribed; that will be proof for them.”

The report about him spread all the more, and great crowds assembled to listen to him and to be cured of their ailments, but he would withdraw to deserted places to pray.” -Luke 5:12-16.